BE 14: Track Overview


Each 90-minute track session receives 1.5 continuing education units
from the following professional organizations: AIA, BPI, GBCI, InterNACHI, NAHB, and NARI. To receive your credits, you must sign in at the beginning of each session

Table of Contents

Opening Keynote: Amanda Sturgeon

Closing Forum: Big Thinkers Answer the Big Questions

Keynote Address

Amanda Sturgeon

Wednesday, March 5, 8:45am – 10:30am | Plenary Space next to Trade Show Floor

It is our great pleasure to welcome Amanda Sturgeon, Vice President and Living Building Challenge Program Director from Seattle, WA, as our BE 14 Keynote Speaker. Ms. Sturgeon has been at the forefront of advancing the practice of architecture and design, pushing it to be more progressive, sustainable, and accountable. Using lessons learned from extensive experience designing and managing some of the most sustainable buildings in the Pacific Northwest and numerous sustainable projects worldwide, she will share her plans for how we might continue to advance the practice of sustainable design into the next century.

Following the keynote will be the presentation of $10,000 to the winner of NESEA’s Zero Net Energy Building Award.

Track 1: Homes

Track Co-Chairs: Chris Briley, Briburn; Jonathan Kantar, Sage Builders

Location: Cityview 1

Note: This track is accredited for MA CSL continuing education hours. Check each session for what topic is covered.

Deep Energy Retrofits: Full Value Proposition

Session 1: Wednesday, March 5, 11:00am-12:30pm

This session will explore the actual performance over the past few years of 2 completed Deep Energy Retrofits in Massachusetts which successfully achieved the ACI Thousand Homes Challenge in 2011-12. From the combined perspective of a builder and an architect experienced with a variety of strategies for achieving energy efficient homes, we will compare the approaches in these two cases with other building techniques and programs such as Energy Star, Energy Plus, Net Zero, and Passive House. In addition to establishing a baseline review of energy, design, construction, and measured performance, this session will focus in on a variety of non-energy benefits, particularly the role of increased property value for homes with high-performance credentials like Energy Star and LEED. Property value increase is a benefit that transcends simple payback and provides vital lessons for energy efficient retrofits positively impacting real estate and community values. Finally, we will explore the evolution of utility programs incentives as they move from their initial pilot phases to the new programs for 2013 and 2014.

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour in Business Practice.

Session Speakers: Brian Butler, Boston Green Building; Henry MacLean, Timeless Architecture

Energy Positive Homes in Devens, MA

Session 2: Wednesday, March 5, 2:00pm-3:30pm

R. Carter Scott of Transformations, Inc. and Kohta Ueno of Building Science Corporation will present case study data on several of the 8 Energy Positive homes built in Devens, MA. As much as 10,000 kwh of extra energy was projected to be produced on 3 of the homes—enough to power a Nissan Leaf or Chevy Volt for 30,000 mile per year. One of the homes has been extensively monitored with wall sensors to record moisture levels of the sheathing and various levels and kinds of insulation including cellulose and low density foam. Comparisons with PassivHaus standard will include construction detailing, achieved airtightness levels, and resulting energy performance. Come learn the details on how to cost effective design and positive homes in a cold climate.

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour in Energy.

Session Speakers: R. Carter Scott, Transformations, Inc.; Kohta Ueno, Building Science Corporation

[back to top]

Affordable, Net Zero Modular – Chasing The Golden Trifecta, Scraping Knees Along the Way

Session 3: Wednesday, March 5, 4:00pm-5:30pm

Kaplan Thompson Architects’ first net zero project, BrightBuilt Barn, evolved into BrightBuilt Home, a line of modular Net Zero homes in 2012. The goal was to make a series of high-performance houses available to a wider market interested in affordability, accessibility, design and construction speed. We will discuss the improvements we have made in our details as we have built more homes, share critical demographics insights, speed bumps in the process, and tradeoffs required to produce high-performance homes with predictable results despite a myriad of new variables.

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour in Business Practice.

Session Speakers: Steve Adamczyk, Setwright; Phil Kaplan, Kaplan Thompson Architects; Parlin Meyer, BrightBuilt Home

Three Deep Energy Retrofits, Three Years Later

Session 4: Thursday, March 6, 8:30am-10:00am

In this session we’ll look at three deep energy retrofits: a single family that approaches Net Zero, a two-family that approaches EnerPHit (the Passive House retrofit standard), and a three-family with co-generation. All of the projects were completed by mid-2011 we have nearly three years of actual performance data to share. Our retrospective on these projects will include hard data on the initial retrofit costs; energy performance data; payback analysis; indoor air quality monitoring results; first-hand feedback from the occupants with regard to what it’s like to own, operate, and live in a home that’s undergone a deep energy retrofit; and lessons learned over time as a result of our direct experience with these projects.

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour in Energy.

Session Speakers: Mike Duclos, DEAP Energy Group; Paul Eldrenkamp, Byggmeister/DEAP Energy Group

[back to top]

Learning from Innovative, Responsive, and Large Scale Energy Efficient Housing in Europe

Session 5: Thursday, March 6, 10:30am-12:00pm

Gregory La Vardera: In Europe, Sweden’s housing market is dominated by industrial production of energy efficient houses. In this mature market fabrication techniques, products, and components have all been optimized for efficient factory building, and the off-site process has been leveraged to make energy efficient construction affordable and universal. Because Sweden and the US share a tradition of wood framed house building their techniques can be readily adopted and suggest a way forward for the North American Housing Industry.

Sheila Kennedy: GOING SOFT — Design, innovation and low carbon construction are changing the future of sustainable urban living. The Soft House, a set row houses built for the International Building Exhibition (IBA) in Hamburg, demonstrates an ‘active’ architecture that responds to environmental conditions and homeowners’ changing needs over time. The Soft House transforms the Passivehaus type, yet exceeds passive-house energy requirements. Traditional wood construction is combined with a kinetic façade and smart building management network. A solid soft wood structure (brettstapel) sequesters carbon, and a responsive photovoltaic textile façade adjusts to sun orientation, creating a soft solar tracking and shading system. Inside the housing units, a low voltage DC ring integrated in moveable household curtains distributes harvested energy for radiant heating, cooling and solid state lighting. The presentation addresses how soft wood construction and integrated design concepts can be taken up in the United States.

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour in Energy.

Session Speakers: Sheila Kennedy, MIT; Gregory La Vardera, Architect

Home Performance is Awesome–So Why Isn’t Every Homeowner Beating Down Your Door?

Session 6: Thursday, March 6, 2:00pm-3:30pm

Most Americans say energy efficiency is important in how they make their daily decisions. In fact, most Americans claim they would prioritize energy efficiency over their comfort and convenience. The reality is quite different. 80% of Americans don’t think they’re using more energy today than they were five years ago and half think their homes are already energy efficient. These misperceptions result in some big barriers home performance contractors must overcome to get homeowners interested in retrofits. So how can contractors – and anyone selling energy efficient products and services – overcome those barriers and gain traction in the market? Suzanne Shelton, CEO of Shelton Group, the nation’s leading marketing and advertising agency entirely focused in the energy and environment sector, will share her firm’s latest quarterly polling of Americans and specific recommendations of how to shift Americans’ thinking and get them on the train to an energy efficient future.

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour in Business Practice.

Session Speakers: Suzanne Shelton, Shelton Group

[back to top]

Track 2: Multifamily

Track Co-Chairs: Joshua Lehman, WinnCompanies; Heather Nolen, Steven Winter Associates

Location: Harborview 1

Megawatts To Go Before We Sleep

Session 1: Wednesday, March 5, 11:00am-12:30pm

Learn the top mistakes that multifamily owners make when financing and designing renewable energy systems. Renewable energy technologies have been widely adopted in multifamily buildings, but many projects still run into common and avoidable pitfalls. For example, do you really know how to make the right decisions when it comes to financing and roof mounting? Come to this session and avoid the lore and misconceptions that decision makers often come across.

Session Chair: Alden Andrade, Stephen Turner Inc.
Session Speakers: Andrew McNamara, Bright Power; Henry Misas, Bright Power

The Perfect HVAC System for Your Multifamily Building

Session 2: Wednesday, March 5, 2:00pm-3:30pm

This session will identify the many variables that influence HVAC & domestic hot water system selection for large (75+ units) multi-family projects. Several project examples will be illustrated including: new construction, mill conversions to housing and occupied rehabs. The large number of variables makes this a complex task that this session will aim to simplify.

Session Chair: Steve David, Viessmann
Session Speakers: James Petersen, Petersen Engineering, Inc.

[back to top]

Think Inside Box: Compartmentalization in Multifamily Buildings

Session 3: Wednesday, March 5, 4:00pm-5:30pm

Effective management of airflow in multifamily buildings is often attempted but rarely achieved. This session will focus on effective methods to air seal between units, as well as exterior walls. Compartmentalizing multifamily units in this way has proven benefits in comfort, health, efficiency, and operating costs. Certification programs such as Energy Star and LEED are catching up. Come to this session to learn how smart practitioners are doing it right.

Session Chair: Don LaTourette, Building Energy Technologies LLC
Session Speakers: Craig Marden, Owens Corning; Caroline Petrovick, Coldham & Hartman Architects

Construction Costs and Operating Costs: Balanced Decision Making

Session 4: Thursday, March 6, 8:30am-10:00am

This session will give real world examples of multi-family affordable housing projects that made decisions about trade-offs between construction costs and reduced operating costs. While project teams strive to have no- or low-cost implications for environmentally responsible building features, sometimes a simple payback analysis or life cycle costing can help make decisions. We will have perspectives from RMI’s Super Efficient Housing Program Manager, a green building consultant and an architect to explore some case studies.

Session Chair: Silvia Rimolo, Boston Financial Investment Management
Session Speakers: Alexis Karolides, Rocky Mountain Institute; Ben Walter, CWS Architects; Jay Waterman, Thornton Tomasetti

[back to top]

Verifying Performance Through Testing and Commissioning

Session 5: Thursday, March 6, 10:30am-12:00pm

Proper design and installation are integral for achieving energy efficient buildings – but to ensure performance, each energy conservation measure must be inspected, tested and verified to provide the expected benefits. This is true in new construction and in retrofitting existing buildings. As part of its ENERGY STAR Multifamily High Rise (MFHR) certification program, EPA has created comprehensive verification and performance testing requirements for new construction and gut rehabs in the mid and high rise sector. These protocols help to ensure that energy efficiency measures make it from design to construction and long-term savings are achieved. The same processes can and should be used for existing buildings, both for commissioning retrofits and for retro-commissioning what’s already there. We will cover some key things to look for when testing, review some common commissioning and retro-commissioning findings, and discuss ways to resolve those issues.

Session Chair: Paul Leveille, The Jordan Institute
Session Speakers: Gayathri Vijayakumar, Steven Winter Associates; Kelly Westby, Steven Winter Associates

Benchmarking at Scale – Lessons Learned from Benchmarking 120,000+ Units of Affordable Housing

Session 6: Thursday, March 6, 2:00pm-3:30pm

This session will report on the results of benchmarking over 120,000 units of affordable housing in Massachusetts as part of the utility sponsored Affordable Housing Metrics project. The process, challenges, and successes of benchmarking at scale will be discussed. The database of historical energy consumption that results from the benchmarking process is being used by building managers, third party energy consultants, utilities, building owners, and policy makers to improve asset management, drive energy efficiency efforts, reduce operating costs, and affect energy policy on a local, state, and national level. Each of these areas will be discussed with a focus on big-picture thinking about how benchmarking at scale can drive an energy agenda at multiple levels and with multiple stake-holders.

Session Chair: Jing Wu, Stephen Turner, Inc.
Session Speakers: Edward F. Connelly, New Ecology, Inc.; Lily Perkins-High, WegoWise, Inc.

[back to top]

Track 3: Commercial & Institutional

Track Co-Chairs: Martine Dion, SMMA; Scott Greenbaum, Greene Energy Consultants LLC

Location: Skyline

The Living Building Challenge: Two Northeast Regional Case Studies

Session 1: Wednesday, March 5, 11:00am-12:30pm

This session will delve into two wide-ranging case studies representing the few Northeast LBC projects (only 50 active LBD nationwide). The Smith College Bechtel Environmental Classroom field station building is on track to receive full certification by early 2014. The Kellogg House at Williams College, a repurposed and expanded historic building, currently in construction (Fall 2013). These projects have broken new ground, faced seemingly insurmountable obstacles (think ZNEB, Zero Net water and Red List for materials) and -so far- prevailed to achieve facilities that go well beyond energy use to include the embodied carbon, water and nutrient cycles, site and societal environmental impacts, and aesthetic and equity issues.

Session Chair: Caroline Petrovick, Coldham & Hartman Architects
Session Speakers: Bruce Coldham, Coldham & Hartman Architects; Charley Stevenson, Integrated Eco Strategy, LLC

A Tale of Two Deep Energy Retrofits: A Path to Net Zero for a Community Center and a Church

Session 2: Wednesday, March 5, 2:00pm-3:30pm

This session will share a story of how strong leadership combined with a supportive city government and informed, actively engaged citizenry, worked in close collaboration to achieve a model deep energy retrofit of a typical municipal structure. The result gave the heavily used, 10,000sf Lower Falls Community Center in Newton, MA a renewed life, while also sharply reducing energy use. We will present a full report on lessons learned and details developed on the project that now inform the design and construction of buildings throughout the City. The project achieved achieved 70% reduction in energy use, dramatically improved indoor air quality and a better controlled, more comfortable and brighter community center. The presentation will include both energy and cost data collected over the past two (2) years .

We will also track a church congregation’s 7 year journey to net zero energy use by their buildings; the process, the economics, the technology, the results, the spiritual joy.

Session Chair: Elizabeth Galloway, SMMA
Session Speakers: Deb Crossley, City of Newton; Steven Jones, South Congregational Church; Jonathan Kantar, Sage Builders

[back to top]

The New Energy Codes and Beyond: How Will This Affect Our Design Practice?

Session 3: Wednesday, March 5, 4:00pm-5:30pm

Owners, Developers, Architects and Engineers, the latest additions of the Energy Codes for Commercial Buildings have arrived! Rhode Island and Massachusetts recently passed IECC 2012. New York State is finalizing the change to IECC – 2012 and others will follow. The new energy codes are becoming the minimum design standards across the nation. What does this mean to our projects, practice and design teams? The new Codes require us to revisit our approach to building design in order to further improve energy performance and building operations. Alternative Compliance Paths maybe a thing of the past! This session will highlights the new Codes criteria, followed with an interactive discussion on best design strategies between our expert panel and attendees.

Session Chair: Tracey Beckstrom, New Buildings Institute
Session Speakers: Mark Halverson, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Vernon Woodworth, AKF Engineering Group

Retro-Commissioning – Why, What, and its Value

Session 4: Thursday, March 6, 8:30am-10:00am

NYC Local law 87 requires it, Boston BERWRO may include as an action, Philadelphia Energy and Water Benchmarking and Disclosure Ordinance, San Francisco Environment Code Chapter 20 (Commercial Building Energy Performance Ordinance), and others coming to a city or town near you. Retro-commisioning is becoming the law so why should a building owner do it and what is the economic value of doing it. Our expert panel will present some case histories showing the results in reduced energy and water consumption and improved comfort. Not just another regulation that cost you money and time with no improvement to your bottom line. It really works!

Session Chair: Steve Di Giacomo, Energy Management Associates, Inc.
Session Speakers: Michael English, Horizon Engineering Associates, LLP; Scott Pinyard, Sebesta Blomberg

[back to top]

Post-Occupancy and Occupant Based Energy Performance in K-12 Schools and Government Facilities – Measure, Learn and Save!

Session 5: Thursday, March 6, 10:30am-12:00pm

As practitioners, we use our knowledge and experience to produce successful energy efficient designs that improve our clients’ environments and create desirable conditions for day-to-day operations. But how well are we doing? What happens when people use the building?

Post-occupancy energy performance may be compared to predicted results and inform the best way to adjust our designs, as well as initiate occupant behavior-based strategies. This session will show predicted and measured energy and daylighting performance as well as exemplar behavior-based energy conservation programs (20%-37% energy savings) in K-12 schools and in a governement agency. We will show data, share attributes of the successful programs, overview of the strategies implemented to involve students/users/employees in saving energy and increasing awareness to sustainability.

Session Chair: Mark Stafford, National Grid
Session Speakers: Kate Crosby, Acton-Boxborough Regional School District; Arnold Sapenter, MA Dept. of Environmental Protection; Margaret Wang, SMMA

Good, Bad and Shady – Sunshading Performance Retrospectives, Lighting Systems and Integrated Fenestration

Session 6: Thursday, March 6, 2:00pm-3:30pm

This session will review recent advances in technology developments, DOE initiatives to recommend a future vision of commercial building design. The building envelope is the cornerstone of a high performance design. To achieve optimum energy performance and comfort, the facade design must be integrated with the interior design as well as the lighting design, while actively controlled to respond to changing exterior conditions and occupant needs. Conversely, controlling the sun’s effect on our thermal and visual comfort is an age-old problem. The presentation will highlight key findings about the effectiveness of different shading devices and the best solutions for controlling solar heat gain and glare, providing daylighting simulations and parametric analysis using Radiance, DaySim, and Ecotect.

Session Chair: Irina Rasputnis, NEEP
Session Speakers: Maure Creager, SAGE Electrochromics; Pekka Hakkarainen, Lutron Electronics; Ranjit Korah, Payette

[back to top]

Track 4: Resilient Cities

Track Co-Chairs: Robert Leaver, New Commons; Dillon Sussman, Ground Truth Design

Location: Harborview 3

From Building Systems to Cities: Setting the Stage

Session 1: Wednesday, March 5, 11:00am-12:30pm

Two seasoned practitioners will be in a facilitated conversation about the city, its infrastructure and buildings. What can be done so the systems of buildings and the city collaborate? What is the decision making framework for a city? How do stakeholders shape the city and what gets built? What municipal policies and standards are effective at driving the “right” practices? What metrics (besides energy use and cost) are important, e.g., public health outcomes?

Session Chair: Robert Leaver, New Commons
Session Speakers: Chris Benedict, Architecture and Energy Ltd.; Thomas Deller, Director of Development, Hartford, CT; Dillon Sussman, Ground Truth Design

Benchmarking and Measuring Resilience

Session 2: Wednesday, March 5, 2:00pm-3:30pm

“You can’t manage what you don’t measure” so this session will propose various metrics of resilience. For example, if a building loses power for an extended period of time, what temperature is habitable? What defines resilience relative to water availability and sanitation? Developing metrics is the first step toward figuring out how to design resilient buildings and communities. This interactive session will provide opportunity for conversation to inform the ongoing work by Resilient Design Institute.

Session Chair: Dillon Sussman, Ground Truth Design
Session Speakers: Seth Holmes, University of Hartford; Alex Wilson, Resilient Design Institute

[back to top]

Community Scale Energy Systems

Session 3: Wednesday, March 5, 4:00pm-5:30pm

As practitioners, our work is to ensure a resilient local energy infrastructure. We will examine models of community heating & cooling, micro-grids, and community shared solar. The principle is locally sited energy systems offer flexibility, economy and efficiency, and that energy diversity equals resilience. The session will showcase European energy systems from the community to building scale that are applicable in the Northeast. The session will address the policy framework enabling community-sized systems to work.

Session Chair: Robert Leaver, New Commons
Session Speakers: Stephen Messinger, KlingStubbins; Andrea Ranger, DNV-GL Energy

Prepare for the Next Disruption: Resilient Buildings

Session 4: Thursday, March 6, 8:30am-10:00am

Superstorm Sandy demonstrated the need for a more resilient built environment. This session will feature results of recent efforts in Boston and NYC to prepare buildings for the next major disruption. A deep dive into emerging techniques for enhancing the resilience of our built environment, will show specific actions that can make buildings and cities more resilient to severe weather and system outages and will introduce policy and code changes worthy of our advocacy.

Session Chair: Dillon Sussman, Ground Truth Design
Session Speakers: Mark Ginsberg, Curtis + Ginsberg Architects; Jim Newman, Linnean Solutions; Sarah Slaughter, Built Environment Coalition

[back to top]

Rebuild or Retreat: Coastal Resilience

Session 5: Thursday, March 6, 10:30am-12:00pm

Efforts to recover from disaster and make coastal neighborhoods more resilient require both imagination and complex implementation. Exploring that interplay, this session features the results of a global design competition to redevelop a large Far Rockaway parcel after Super-storm Sandy (FAR ROC “For A Resilient Rockaway”), and “lessons learned” from a seasoned planner who led comprehensive planning for New Orleans after Katrina. The ensuing conversation will explore design innovation, politics, market forces, and environment.

Session Chair: Dillon Sussman, Ground Truth Design
Session Speakers: Steven Bluestone, The Bluestone Organization; Larissa Brown, Goody Clancy; Pat Sapinsley, Watt Not/Build Efficiently

“Awesome Ideas” About the Future of Cities

Session 6: Thursday, March 6, 2:00pm-3:30pm

What awesome ideas – old and new – will help practitioners take cities where they need to go next? This is an imagining session. Topics might include: place-making, mobility oriented development, retrofitting buildings for resilience and energy efficiency, water, digital technology, and community engagement for deeper resilience. The session will open by a short talk on the creative tension between sustainability and resilience. Then present the most provocative, future city-making ideas from the previous 5 sessions. Then there will be 6 Pecha Kucha presentations of 20 slides, each for 20 seconds. Facilitated conversation will follow the presentations.

Session Chair: Robert Leaver, New Commons
Session Speakers: Declan Keefe, Placetailor; F.L. Andrew Padian, The Community Preservation Corporation; Bernice Radle, Buffalo Energy; John Tooley, Advanced Energy; Ellen Watts, Architerra

[back to top]

Track 5: High Performance Mechanicals

Track Co-Chairs: Robb Aldrich, Steven Winter Associates; Matthew Holden, Sparhawk Group

Location: Cityview 2

Note: This track is accredited for MA CSL continuing education hours. Check each session for what topic is covered.

Heat Pumps, Heat Pumps and More Heat Pumps

Session 1: Wednesday, March 5, 11:00am-12:30pm

In the interest of supporting zero net energy building efforts, this session will look at applications of air source heat pumps for space heating and cooling, domestic hot water, and pool heating. Real projects and data will be presented, along with lessons learned.

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour in Energy.

Session Speakers: Marc Rosenbaum, South Mountain Company

Cost-Effective Fuel Cells in Commercial Buildings

Session 2: Wednesday, March 5, 2:00pm-3:30pm

The utilization of hydrogen energy through the application of fuel cell technology has seen increased popularity over the last decade. This session will discuss and provide information regarding more commercially popular fuel cell technologies, the types of applications and the prerequisites for successful financial models, how to size and price the technology, as well as leveraging incentives. We will review actual fuel cell operational data and compare to the calculated expectations. We will end with a summary of ideas which may allow this technology to be applied to a broader commercial application.

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour in Energy.

Session Speakers: Clifton Greim, Harriman Associates; [back to top]

Convergence of Submetering, Temperature Control and Demand Response with Advances in Wireless Technology

Session 3: Wednesday, March 5, 4:00pm-5:30pm

This session details the energy and cost savings available with the combination of submetering electrical power, temperature control and temperature sensing and demand response. Results from implementing this program in a multifamily building will be reported. The addition of demand response in recent years has made demands on wireless systems for faster and more reliable systems and growth into ever larger applications. A high level review of the history of wireless technology will be provided along with what practitioners should know about wireless technology that reduces project cost to enable more applications of submetering, temperature control and demand response.

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour (Elective).

Session Speakers: Jordan Dentz, Levy Partnership; Timothy P. Lynch, PEPCO Controls

Multifamily Ventilation: Where Does Air Come From?

Session 4: Thursday, March 6, 8:30am-10:00am

Exhaust ventilation is the norm in multifamily housing, but roof-top fans pulling air from multiple apartments leave many questions, including:
- Does air actually get removed from all apartments?
- If so, where does the makeup air come from?

Sometimes air is intended to come from hallways, some packaged HVAC systems have outdoor air inlets, and sometimes builders install trickle vents to introduce outdoor air. How much air actually comes in through these pathways? A research project – including rigorous short- and long-term testing of pressures and airflow patterns in five new buildings – has attempted provide some answers. While there are still many questions, this session will present findings to date and recommendations for best practice.

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour in Workplace Safety.

Session Speakers: Sean Maxwell, Steven Winter Associates

[back to top]

New Pumps: Versatility and Efficiency from the Self Sensing Revolution and ECM

Session 5: Thursday, March 6, 10:30am-12:00pm

Self-sensing pumps and highly efficiency motors of ECM design will be reviewed for applications and delivering highest efficiency. Specifically: 1) self-sensing and how it works to minimize pump energy, 2) effects of variable flow pumps on efficiency and balancing, 3) pros and cons to controlling on temperature or pressure differential, and 4) DOE and ASHRAE activities on pump regulations and performance.

Case studies will be used to illustrate best practices, efficiency, savings and lessons from the field.

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour in Energy.

Session Speakers: Mark Hunt, WILO USA LLC; Steve Thompson, Taco, Inc.

Performance of Ductless Heat Pumps in the Northeast

Session 6: Thursday, March 6, 2:00pm-3:30pm

In recent years we’ve seen increasing interest in the use of ductless air-source heat pumps (or “mini-splits”) for cold climate applications, particularly for space conditioning in low-load houses and for offsetting electric resistance heat or delivered fossil fuels in existing homes. With interest in the technology growing, a relatively small base of experience is available to tap thus far. This session provides an opportunity to learn from two presenters with significant program and technical experience. It comprises two case studies, one focused on the installation of over 1,000 ductless heat pumps in Maine and one focused directly on the measured performance of a single installation in southwestern Vermont.

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour in Energy.

Session Speakers: Bruce Harley, Conservation Services Group; Andy Meyer, Efficiency Maine

[back to top]

Track 6: What the Pros Want to Know

Track Co-Chairs: Kate Goldstein, MIT; Rachel White, Byggmeister

Location: Harborview 2

Note: This track is accredited for MA CSL continuing education hours. Check each session for what topic is covered.

Home Ventilation: How Important Is It Really?

Session 1: Wednesday, March 5, 11:00am-12:30pm

This session will review what we know about the health benefits of ventilation. We will also put ventilation in context, to ask, relative to other changes we can make it homes, how important are ventilation upgrades. If you are wondering what ventilation standard to follow, how much it matters, and what else can be done to create healthier living environments, this session is for you. We will answer key questions and undoubtedly raise others.

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour in Workplace Safety.

Session Speakers: Ellen Tohn, Tohn Environmental Strategies; TBA

Human Building Interaction: Solving the Occupant Problem

Session 2: Wednesday, March 5, 2:00pm-3:30pm

When buildings don’t perform as specified, occupants are often blamed for failing to change habits. According to Lester Shen, this is the wrong way to think about building efficiency. Shen challenges us to reframe our approach to high performance building via the concept of Human Building Interaction (HBI). HBI reveals assumptions, habits, and constraints that govern our relationship to buildings, and instead of forcing occupants to change, leverages existing behaviors to achieve performance objectives.

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour (Elective).

Session Chair: Spencer Lawrence
Session Speakers: Lester Shen, Center for Energy and Environment

[back to top]

Energy vs. Water

Session 3: Wednesday, March 5, 4:00pm-5:30pm

The looming energy and water crises must be solved together. A growing population, a deteriorating water infrastructure, and our outdated national water policies constitute a severe threat. Thermo-electric power plants, industrial wastewater wells, and now “fracking” stress our water needs. The good news is the home performance industry can help bring about major change: with every KWH reduction, we can help reduce water use by 0.5 gallons. Promise: this session = results.

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour in Energy.

Session Chair: Josh Habib, Cadums Group
Session Speakers: John Tooley, Advance Energy

Fun with Home Performance Data

Session 4: Thursday, March 6, 8:30am-10:00am

Data can tell us lots of things. But these things don’t always correspond to reality. This session’s presenters will share what they have learned about home performance from large datasets, including how to generate statistically valid information that is also relevant to field practitioners. You’ll come away understanding what we can learn about home performance from large datasets, and what we can’t, as well as best practices for working with data.

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour (Elective).

Session Speakers: Michael Blasnik, Michael Blasnik & Associates; Kate Goldstein, MIT

[back to top]

Sustainability in Real Estate: Five Key Trends & What They Mean For You

Session 5: Thursday, March 6, 10:30am-12:00pm

As head of sustainability at one of the country’s largest landlords, Sukanya Paciorek has her finger on the pulse of critical challenges facing large property owners. She will discuss five key industry trends: energy efficiency and the allocation of capital; onsite generation; tenant engagement; public disclosure; and the link between energy efficiency and investor value. She will also share lessons learned based on her experience retrofitting over twenty buildings including ten in Manhattan.

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour in Energy.

Session Chair: Amanda Harding, Stephen Turner, Inc.
Session Speakers: Sukanya Paciorek, Vornado Realty Trust

The Science Behind Insulation: Ignore At Your Peril

Session 6: Thursday, March 6, 2:00pm-3:30pm

If you think spec sheets tells you everything you need to know about the thermal performance of insulation, think again. You also need to know the science behind insulation. In this session two building science experts with a half-century combined experience review how insulation works (foam and fibrous) and explore how factors such as temperature, density and air infiltration impact thermal performance. You will come away with field-tested knowledge you can immediately apply to your projects.

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour in Energy.

Session Speakers: Marcus Bianchi, Owens Corning; Achilles Karagiozis, Owens Corning

[back to top]

Track 7: Fundamentals of Advanced Construction

Track Co-Chairs: Brian Legg, Community Action; Mark Newey, Center for EcoTechnology

Location: Waterfront 1

Note: This track is accredited for MA CSL continuing education hours. Check each session for what topic is covered.

High Performance Enclosures

Session 1: Wednesday, March 5, 11:00am-12:30pm

High-performance homes require roofs, walls, and foundations that drastically reduce heat loss, prevent air infiltration, and manage water intrusion, goals that are sometimes at odds with one another. This session will explore the details of continuous insulation, vapor profiles, airtightness testing, and window flashing used in zero energy homes, Passive Houses, and other high performance buildings.

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour in Energy.

Session Speakers: Peter Yost, BuildingGreen

Passive House EnerPHit: Take Your Building Deeper

Session 2: Wednesday, March 5, 2:00pm-3:30pm

Passivhaus has been the standard for cutting edge Energy Efficiency since the 1990s. Passivhaus has recently come out with the new EnerPHit Standard for Deep Energy retrofits of existing buildings because typical existing conditions can make the Passivhaus Standard practically impossible to achieve. With Passivhaus methodology and components the implemented retrofit should result in the maximum improvement reasonably achievable with respect to thermal comfort, structural protection, cost-effectiveness and energy efficiency. Please join Ken Levenson and Tomas O’Leary as they go into the details and implications of this new Passivhaus standard for Deep Energy Retrofits

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour (Elective).

Session Speakers: Ken Levenson, 475 High Performance Building Supply; Tomas O’Leary, Passive House Academy

[back to top]

Transforming Your Business Towards High Performance

Session 3: Wednesday, March 5, 4:00pm-5:30pm

As you contemplate re-focusing your business on high performance building, what are the key components, team members, and skills sets that set the path for success? In this session, members of the Wright Builders team will describe how to identify the skills and partners you need, how to position your business through marketing, public service, and public awareness, how to talk about value, what to do and not to do, how to differentiate yourself from others, showing results without overwhelming folks, scaling up and scaling down, and celebrating success.

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour in Business Practice.

Session Speakers: The Wright Builders team: Jonathan Wright, Principal; Mark Ledwell, Principal; Linda Gaudreau, Operations Manager; Lynn Badgett, Senior Estimator; Melissa Caldwell, Executive Sales and Marketing Associate; James Saucier, Project Foreman;
Mark Newey, Center for EcoTechnology

Multifamilies for (those of us that no longer want to be) Dummies

Session 4: Thursday, March 6, 8:30am-10:00am

37% of all renters live in MultiFamily Housing. That’s more than 17,000 households nation wide. This sector has historically had difficulty to getting conservation projects off the ground for a wide number of reasons, but that is changing. It’s a new frontier for MultiFamily Energy efficiency and we’ve got Jon Braman, Betsy Glynn, and Heather Nolen to demystify the process. Don’t miss this session as we discuss Benchmarking, Financing, Project implementation & several case studies. Bring your questions!

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour in Energy.

Session Speakers: Jon Braman, Bright Power; Betsy Glynn, LISC; Heather Nolen, Steven Winter Associates

[back to top]

High Performance HVAC

Session 5: Thursday, March 6, 10:30am-12:00pm

High performance homes require a different kind of thinking for HVAC systems. The loads are often so low that it is hard to find equipment that will provide comfort at decent efficiencies. We’ll look at the options and pro’s and cons for various approaches, and look at how these choices are determined by the enclosure efficiency, the layout of the home, the climate, the budget, available fuels, the owners’ energy and environmental goals, and by any particular needs for climate control inside the building.

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour in Energy.

Session Speakers: Andy Shapiro, Energy Balance, Inc.

House & House+ as a System

Session 6: Thursday, March 6, 2:00pm-3:30pm

“The house was so tight, you’d slam the door and the toilet would flush.” Have you ever heard anyone say that? How about hearing about someone getting Carbon Monoxide poisoning from a backdrafting heating system? Every decision we make in a house has an effect on the system as a whole and knowing how these systems interact can save a life, prevent a lawsuit, or get you the most bang for your buck in conservation upgrades.
Paul Jackson and Steve Antonini will explain how the House as a System works. After that, Andrew Webster will discuss some of the pitfalls to guard against when that system has had a Deep Energy Retrofit applied.

Accredited for 1 MA CSL continuing education hour (Elective).

Session Speakers: Steve Antonini, SMOC/Green Jobs Academy; Paul Jackson, SMOC/Green Jobs Academy; Andrew Webster, Coldham & Hartman Architects

[back to top]

Track 8: Moving the Market/Energy Policy

Track Co-Chairs: Ian Finlayson, MA Dept. of Energy Resources; Spencer Lawrence, EBI Consulting

Location: Waterfront 2

To Own or To Lease? That is the Solar Financing Question

Session 1: Wednesday, March 5, 11:00am-12:30pm

With the ongoing boom in Solar PV installations a common question for homeowners and businesses alike is whether to lease vs. own a solar PV array. This session will cover perspectives from the industry on this central financing decision as well as a policy perspective on how SREC program design, and specifically the new MA SREC II program has implications for the own vs. lease equation.

Session Moderator: Michael Judge, MA Dept. of Energy Resources
Session Speakers: Evan Dube, Sun Run; Sara Ross, Sungage Financial

Renewable Thermal: Pursuing the Policy Pipeline

Session 2: Wednesday, March 5, 2:00pm-3:30pm

As New England copes with rising energy costs and strives to achieve climate and energy goals, it has become clear that policy-makers and industry leaders need to rethink traditional energy programs, policies, and energy delivery business models. A significant opportunity has emerged for renewable heating and cooling (RH&C) – including solar hot water, high efficiency biomass thermal, and advanced heat pumps – to provide significant greenhouse gas emission reductions and add new life to old energy business services.

Please join regional policy-makers, business leaders, and experts for a facilitated discussion on the policies, programs, and business services that are transforming the heating and cooling market in New England.

Session Moderator: Neil Veilleux, Meister Consulting Group
Session Speakers: Bram Claeys, MA Dept. of Energy Resources; Richard Faesy, Energy Futures Group; Craig Snyder, Wesson Energy

[back to top]

Shining a Light on LEDs

Session 3: Wednesday, March 5, 4:00pm-5:30pm

LED lighting is a disruptive technology, but its fast-paced change makes it difficult to know where the best applications and the state of the art currently lies. Join a panel of experts who will cover the spectrum discussing replacing conventional lighting, improving lighting design and efficiency in new buildings through new form factors, controls or other approaches, and innovative applications of lighting that LEDs now make possible.

Session Moderator: Carlos Alonso-Niemeyer, Reflex Lighting Group
Session Speakers: Fred Davis, Fred Davis Corporation; Glenn Heinmiller, LAM Partners; Susanne Seitinger, Color Kinetics, Philips Lighting

AIMing for Greatness: Learning to Love the Smart Grid

Session 4: Thursday, March 6, 8:30am-10:00am

Utilities are deploying innovative smart grid technologies to make New York and Massachusetts electricity systems more robust, resilient and adaptable. Attendees will receive an update on the status of regulatory and political initiatives surrounding the implementation of smart grid technologies. Topics will include the status of pilot projects, adoption of smart meters, policies on data, time variable rates for C&I and residential customers, and grid integration of EV chargers, solar, storage, and CHP.

Session Moderator: Christina Halfpenny, MA Dept. of Energy Resources
Session Speakers: Joseph Fiori, Conservation Services Group; James Gallagher, NYS Smart Grid Consortium; Chris Kallaher, Direct Energy

[back to top]

Software Service Solutions

Session 5: Thursday, March 6, 10:30am-12:00pm

This panel will showcase innovative companies that are walking the talk in making the energy efficiency industry more efficient. WegoWise offers a simple yet sophisticated online platform for benchmarking and analysing the energy and water performance of buildings. Retroficiency crunches interval meter data combined with building characteristics to produce insightful Virtual Energy Assessments. Ekotrope furthers sustainability in buildings by finding energy efficient designs that cost less to build.

Session Moderator: Spencer Lawrence, EBI Consulting
Session Speakers: Richard Huntley, Retroficiency; Cy Kilbourn, Ekotrope; Barun Singh, WegoWise

[back to top]

New Frontiers in Energy Data: A Closer Look at Homes and Offices

Session 6: Thursday, March 6, 2:00pm-3:30pm

While we currently know little about the energy performance of our homes and offices, that is changing fast. Building energy rating and disclosure laws are being enacted across the country, including in NYC, Boston, and Philadelphia. IMT has supported and analyzed the benefits of building disclosure primarily for commercial office and multi-family buildings. At the household level, Sagewell has pioneered the use of thermal imaging, and other data to rapidly assess the energy efficiency investment potential of households.

Session Moderator: Ian Finlayson, MA Dept. of Energy Resources
Session Speakers: Caroline Keicher, IMT; Pasi Miettinen, Sagewell

[back to top]

Track 9: Renewables/The Grid

Track Co-Chairs: Rob Meyers, South Mountain Company; Fred Unger, Heartwood Group

Location: Beacon Hill Complex

Understanding Our Energy Distribution Systems

Session 1: Wednesday, March 5, 11:00am-12:30pm

Everyone uses energy but few understand the sophisticated distribution systems that deliver electricity and fuel to our homes and businesses. How robust are these systems? What are the potential failure points? Are these systems ready for the future? Attend this session to learn about the current state of our electrical grid and natural gas distribution network as well as why these systems need to change in order to accommodate increasing levels of distributed renewable generation.

Session Chair: Emily Rochon, Boston Community Capital
Session Speakers: Richard Levitan, Levitan Associates; Paul Peterson, Synapse Energy Economics, Inc.


Rethinking the Architecture of the Grid – Visions for 2030

Session 2 and 3: Wednesday, March 5, 2:00pm-5:30pm

Session Chairs: Karl Munzel, RGS Energy; Stephan Wollenburg, Cape Light Compact
Session Speakers: Nora Mead Brownell, Epsy Energy Solutions; Janet Gail Besser, NECEC; Paul Roberti, RI Public Utilities Commission; Tim Roughan, National Grid; Jigar Shah, Jigar Shah Consulting

This three-hour session will explore technology and policy solutions to enable a more robust, reliable, environmentally responsible and affordable electricity grid of the future. Our panel will include policy makers, utility officials, and leaders in the energy industry. We’ll be presented with competing ideas for how the electrical distribution system and energy markets should be organized in the future, followed by a break and a robust discussion of those ideas.

[back to top]

Microgrids

Session 4: Thursday, March 6, 8:30am-10:00am

University and hospital campuses, manufacturing facilities, and datacenters, with critical energy needs employ on-site power systems that operate in parallel with, or disconnected from, a utility grid. Traditionally deployed as backup power systems, policy makers, developers, and building owners are exploring how microgrids with renewable energy generation might serve to increase facility, and community, resiliency. We’ll explore microgrids and the movement toward DC nanogrids. We’ll also examine emerging microgrid ownership and finance models, and regulatory issues.

Session Chair: Galen Nelson, MA CEC
Session Speakers: Edward Krapels, Anbaric Microgrid; Len Loomans, Acuity Power Group; Genevieve Sherman, CEFIA

Renewable Energy Storage

Session 5: Thursday, March 6, 10:30am-12:00pm

Energy derived from solar and wind is variable by nature. Energy storage systems smooth out these intermittent resources, allowing grid operators to throttle supply to match consumption. Recent regulatory changes create a higher value for storage; this market is on the precipice of explosive growth. This session will examine storage technologies being used today, and provide an overview of developments in storage solutions. We will also explore the business opportunities provided by linking renewables with storage.

Session Chair: Rob Meyers, South Mountain Company
Session Speakers: George Baker, Vcharge; Tom Leyden, Solar Grid Storage

Pricing Solar Energy

Session 6: Thursday, March 6, 2:00pm-3:30pm

Today’s electricity prices reflect neither the costly “externalities” of fossil and nuclear fueled generation, nor the real benefits of solar generation to ratepayers, local utilities and the grid. We’ll look at wholesale market price suppression, fuel price risk mitigation, avoided transmission spending, long term contracting, grid reliability, power quality and mitigating utility investment risks. We’ll explore current electricity pricing mechanisms, how solar should be appropriately valued, and the policy questions regarding how to get there.

Session Chair: Fred Unger, Heartwood Group
Session Speakers: Rick Hornby, Synapse Energy Economics; Anne Hoskins, Maryland Public Service Commission; Richard Perez, SUNY Albany

[back to top]

Track 10: Materials – Design for a Healthy World

Track Co-Chairs: Jean Carroon, Goody Clancy; Marc Rosenbaum, South Mountain Company

Location: Waterfront 3

The Clock is Ticking – Reducing Embodied Carbon

Session 1: Wednesday, March 5, 11:00am-12:30pm

In the race to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the next twenty years are critical. When a high efficiency building opens, emissions (or embodied carbon) from the materials and construction processes have already occurred and even a 30 or 40 year payback is an unaffordable luxury in terms of climate change. Two practitioners working at very different scales will describe how embodied carbon can be tracked and reduced in design and construction.

Session Speakers: Larry Strain, Siegel & Strain Architects; Myrrh Caplan, Skanska USA Commercial Development

When is Less More or More Less? – Building Envelope Comparisons

Session 2: Wednesday, March 5, 2:00pm-3:30pm

Which is best for the environment in the short and long term – deep energy retrofits, Passive House or minimum code compliant structures? Which high performance envelope offers the best life-cycle carbon and energy savings? The answers may surprise and will certainly lead to energetic conversations about how the evolving tool of Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) can influence design. Speakers will compare overall performance, carbon and energy in Passive House and other efficient building envelopes.

Session Speakers: Rolf Jacobson, University of Minnesota; Erin Moore, University of Oregon

[back to top]

Spec This…Not That

Session 3: Wednesday, March 5, 4:00pm-5:30pm

With a title borrowed (stolen?) from a BuildingGreen webcast, this session promises guidance from the experts on how to navigate through the expanding morass of greenwash that product manufacturers have embraced. How do you separate the solid green from the soggy greenwash? How do you circumvent the landmines of non-transparency, product availability and cost to create a truly green building or meet the Living Building Challenge? Fear not, it will all be revealed.

Session Speakers: Bruce Coldham, Coldham & Hartman Architects; Tristan Roberts, BuildingGreen; Amanda Sturgeon, International Living Building Institute

Dematerializing Buildings – Building Better with Less

Session 4: Thursday, March 6, 8:30am-10:00am

The session will explore the cutting edge of material science for the built environment and the challenge of putting these advances into actual practice. The speakers will show a profusion of radical new innovations for dematerialization drawing from fields such as nanotechnology and biomimicry. They will engage participants in identifying risks and dealing with challenges to using these lightweighting techniques and technologies to improve building performance, durability, and resilience.

Session Speakers: Howard J. Brown, dMass Inc.; Mark Loeffler, Atelier Ten

[back to top]

To Build or Not To Build? – Quantifying Environmental Value

Session 5: Thursday, March 6, 10:30am-12:00pm

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a robust and quantitative process that provides a comprehensive evaluation of environmental benefits and trade-offs. Speakers will describe LCA methodologies for whole building analysis and reference studies that sought answers to complex questions about building reuse and new construction. One case study demonstrates how environmental costs and benefits were incorporated into traditional life-cycle cost analyses (LCCAs) and total ownership cost (TOC) analyses for military construction projects.

Session Speakers: Amanda Pike, Quantis; Cherilyn Widell, Seraph, LLC

Product Transparency – The Brave New World

Session 6: Thursday, March 6, 2:00pm-3:30pm

There is a rapidly growing movement within the building products industry to embrace transparency and avoid using toxic chemicals. Programs like the Health Product Declaration (HPD) are empowering consumers to demand transparency and creating new platforms for manufacturers to communicate. The panel will provide an overview of the initiatives driving the movement, analyze the persistent barriers to transparency from the manufacturer perspectives and outline how market leading companies are embracing programs to connect with consumers.

Session Speakers: Jennifer Atlee, Health Product Declaration Collaborative; Nadav Malin, BuildingGreen; Aaron Smith, ASSA ABLOY Door Security Solutions

[back to top]

Whole Systems in Action

Track Chair: Jamie Wolf, Wolfworks, Inc.

Location: Back Bay Complex

Thriving in a Generative Enterprise

Session 1: Wednesday, March 5, 11:00am-12:30pm

How we are organized to work and serve is as important as our technical competence. Learn from NESEA members in active businesses how they are thriving, what they struggle with, and about the arc of their careers. Discover the strategic capacities we must all develop and depend on to meet a triple bottom line with clear measures of service to profits, people, and the planet. We will explore a range of business experiences across disciplines, scale, ownership, and ambition. We will also introduce “BE Bottom Lines” an exciting new NESEA initiative to establish a group of regional peer group business networks to enhance our business capabilities through bi-annual meetings and year-round engagement.

Session Speakers: John Abrams, South Mountain Company; Paul Eldrenkamp, Byggmeister/DEAP Energy Group

Emerging/Game Changing Technologies

Session 2: Wednesday, March 5, 2:00pm-3:30pm

Solar, wind, hydro and biofuels are proven renewable energy technologies, but are there other ‘game changing’ technologies emerging that minimize fuel, emissions, and harmful waste? Controversial new energy technologies include advanced ultra-high efficiency motors, energetic plasma, electromagnetic field devices, and low energy nuclear reaction systems (LENR). Some of these employ reactions between atoms not yet fully modeled by conventional physics. Learn how LENR/CF, new magnetic and solid state energy generation technologies, as well as new low cost water treatment could be commercialized. Over the next 5 to 25 years, these systems may provide wide scale emission-free, low-cost sources of heat, AC, water, power, and steam.

Session Speakers: James P. Dunn, Future Solar Systems; Theodore C. Loder, University of New Hampshire
Session Chairs: Henry MacLean, Timeless Architecture; Ambrose Spencer, R.E.A.D.
Moderator: Amelia Amon, Alt. Technica

The Forest and Trees: Making Smart Choices

Session 3: Wednesday, March 5, 4:00pm-5:30pm

Our forests are a dynamic renewable resource from which we can produce energy and serve the material needs of building, including exciting new structural applications. Are we making smart choices about that use? The choices we make about how these resources are managed and appropriately used require us to make sense of system dynamics with competing short and long term effects on climate. They impact regional and global environments and economies, local livelihoods, traditional craft and vernacular style, and the durability and longevity of what we build. They are sources of spiritual renewal, retreat and recreation, and are simultaneously resilient and fragile. We need to understand and appreciate the forest system in order to make smart choices about how it is used.

Session Speakers:  Brent Ehrlich, BuildingGreen; Robert Perschel, Forest Guild

[back to top]

Closing Forum

Big Thinkers Answer the Big Questions

Session 7: Thursday March 6, 4:00pm-5:30pm

This is your big opportunity to hear what some of the thought leaders in the field of building sustainability are thinking about right now and what they see coming that will change the way we design and build. These six panelists will consider some big questions about the state of the art and science of sustainability and where we are heading in 2014 and beyond. After answering our big questions, they will answer some big questions from the audience.

Our Big Questions:

1. What is one big thing that you have been working on, but have yet to solve?

2. What big problem have you recently seen solved? What allowed it to happen?

3. What recent breakthrough in your field do you think is going to be a game changer (project, technology, material, system or data set)?

4. What big problems do you see that you think will be resolved within the next two years?

5. What recent project excites you? Why?

6. What practices have you seen over the past year that were not being done before?

7. What mistakes are you still seeing in your industry?

8. Where are the big breakthroughs going to be in the next 2-3 years that will change the way we live and/or build?

Session Chair: Marc Sternick (Conference Chair), Dietz & Company Architects
Session Speakers: Adam Cohen, Structures Design/Build; Richard Faesy, Energy Futures Group; Sheila Kennedy, MIT School of Architecture; Katrin Klingenberg, Passive House Institute, US; Nadav Malin, BuildingGreen;

[back to top]